elderly couple weighing their long term care options at a dining room table

Dispelling 3 Myths of Long-term care

How much of our lives do we spend thinking about the future? When we’re kids, we think about what we’re going to be when we grow up, what our first car will be, whether or not we’ll get married or if we’ll have children of our own.

At some point, we stop thinking about the future—usually when it stops being fun to imagine. But this is when thinking about the future becomes the most important.

Common Misconceptions Regarding Long-term Care

Myth #1: Medicare will pay for it.

No. Medicare will not pay for your long-term care needs. While Medicare is designed to help those over the age of 65 keep on top of their healthcare needs, long-term care is not one of them according to the federal government. And while Medicare Supplemental plans are often touted to cover things that Medicare leaves behind, long-term care is still not one of them.

Myth #2: I won’t need long-term care.

While this may be true for some, according to Longtermcare.gov, if you were to turn 65 today, you would have almost a 70 percent chance of needing some form of long-term care service during your remaining years.

The generation currently facing the greatest growing need for long-term care services are the Baby Boomers. Born between 1946 and 1964, the Baby Boomer generation accounts for roughly 78 million Americans, and according to Medicare.gov, it is estimated that 12 million of them will require long-term care services by 2020.

Myth #3: My spouse or kids will take care of me.

According to the National Academy of Social Insurance, it is estimated that 25 to 30 percent of the baby boomer generation “will become divorced or widowed by the time they reach ages 55 to 64,” increasing the likelihood of needing to depend on one’s children to provide care.

However, studies have shown that rates of childlessness continue to rise. According to the Center for Disease Control, new data has shown that the birthrate has hit an all-time low. This statistic may not have as large of an impact on older generations who have more children than it will eventually for younger generations that do not.

Taking Control Of Your Future

According to an article from Forbes, “A private room in a nursing home now costs consumers more than $8,000 per month, or $97,455 per year… That’s an increase of 5.5 from just one year ago and a nearly 50% increase since 2004. A semi-private room is less expensive, but still carries a hefty price tag: $85,775 per year.”

Assisted living facilities are more affordable but the national average for a private room will still run approximately $45k a year — which is actually proving to be more affordable than in-home health aids ($49,192) and standard homemaker-type services ($47,934), according to the Genworth 2017 Cost of Care Study.

With the yearly cost of long-term care only continuing to rise, long-term care insurance can help both you and your family cover the cost of your care should you need it in the future.

To learn more about long-term care insurance or what other products may be available to you, please visit your association page for more information.

Daughter worrying about mothers long-term care needs

How To Know When A Loved One Needs Long-Term Care

Studies show that roughly 70 percent of individuals aged 65 or older will require long-term care at some point.

But determining just when a loved one may need long-term care can be difficult both mentally as well as emotionally. To help make things easier, here are some key factors to look for when determining if your loved one could benefit from long-term care:

  1. Recent Accidents

Accidents and medical scares are a key indicator that your loved one may need additional help. Falls, fender-benders or car accidents, mismanaging prescriptions can all be scary and stressful for loved ones, caregivers, and everyone involved.

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Dispelling 4 Myths of Long Term Care Insurance

Did you know that 70% of people over 65 will require some care at some point in their lives? Nearly 44% of early and late Baby Boomers and Gen Xers are expected to fall short of meeting their basic financial needs in retirement – that is including their nursing home or home health needs. Based on these statistics it appears that a very large portion of us are entirely unprepared for retirement. Long-term care insurance can help ease the financial and emotional burden on you and your loved ones.

Why is it that so many of us do not purchase long term care insurance? Let’s dispel the myths!

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The Holidays are the Perfect Time to Discuss Long-Term Care

The holidays will be here before we know it, and for many, this time of the year presents the opportunity to gather with family and loved ones. Specifically, if you have a loved one who you’ve been meaning to speak with about long-term care, the holidays could be the ideal time for you to do so. Of course, having the conversation with a loved one about long-term care isn’t always easy, which is why there are important guidelines to keep in mind before you initiate the discussion.

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Long Term Disability vs. Long Term Care Insurance

There are a number of different insurance options that can assist you and your family if you become impaired or disabled. Two of the most popular options are long-term disability and long-term care. Both of these are designed to protect your assets and interests in distinctive ways, so knowing the differences between the two is key in determining how each one can be beneficial to meet your needs.

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Tips for Long-Term Care as Rates Rise

When considering retirement plans, long-term care coverage shouldn’t be overlooked. The cost of long-term care is exorbitant — figures from 2010 estimated that a semi-private room in a nursing home can cost more than $6,200 per month, with private rooms costing over $6,900. An assisted living facility in 2010 could cost as much as $3,300 per month. And those rates are only going up in the future. Seniors without long-term care insurance are left paying these high monthly bills out of pocket, often depleting their retirement savings, which took decades to build, within only a few years.

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The Best Time to Purchase Long-Term Care Insurance

The time to start thinking about long-term care insurance isn’t when you’re ill and in need of either home health care or a nursing home. By then, it will be too late. Unfortunately, many people in situations very similar to yours overlook the importance of long-term care insurance, assuming it’s something they won’t need for many years to come or even need at all.

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The Dangers of Avoiding the Tough Conversations

In the landscape of family issues, few topics are more difficult to approach than that of aging parents. Regardless of your economic background or your relationship with your parents, these topics prove to be difficult for individuals across the board. One of the reasons that these topics are so difficult to address is because of the strong emotions that are often attached to the idea of our parents aging and possibly needing our help. When parents begin to age, there is a role reversal for parents and kids that can be, at best, uneasy. However, there are more important issues at stake than our mere comfort levels when it comes to keeping our parents or other aging family members’ best interests in mind. One of the best places to start preparing for these tough conversations is to identify the topics that need addressing.

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